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More Than 70 pilgrims killed by Islamic State truck bomb in Iraq

More Than 70 pilgrims killed by Islamic State truck bomb in Iraq

At least 70 people have been killed in the suicide bombing of the Islamic State, a militant group, while Iraqi troops are fighting for the withdrawal of Mosul. They were mostly Shi'ite pilgrims south of Baghdad. Authorities say truck bombs have exploded through a gas station parked in a faithful bus at the Arbain ceremony in Karbala. Most of the victims are Iranians, one of the largest foreigners in the Holy Land pilgrimage, one of the largest religious events in the world.

The attack occurred near the town of Shomali, about 120 kilometers southeast of Baghdad.


IS, who is fighting to defend Mosul's stronghold in northern Iraq, claimed responsibility for the attack. IS said in a statement from the SITE Intelligence Group that the bomber "has blown up his vehicle while he is arresting more than 200 victims and wounded, including Iranians."

Falah al-Radhi, the chief of the Babylonian local security committee, who was involved in the bombing, said he was targeting several buses.

"A large truck exploded between them, it was a suicide attack," he told AFP.

"At least 70 people have died, less than 10 are Iraqis, and the rest are Iranians.

Videos circulated through social media have shown that fragments are scattered over large areas along major freeways connecting Baghdad and Basra, the main port city of Basra.

"The scene has a completely skewed body." Senator Randy added that at least 20 people were injured in the nearby hospital.

The joint operational command of Baghdad announced that trucks were filled with 500 liters of ammonium nitrate, a compound used in many explosive devices.

Bastion attack
This year, 20 million people visited Karbala with the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussein (RA) of Arbaeen. According to Iraqi authorities, about 3 million people were Iranians.

Iraq deployed to protect the pilgrims from an IS attack, fearing the 25,000 security forces around the shrine and the surrounding city in the southwest of Baghdad.

The militants, who have lost ground in Mosul since the Iraqi army attacked the northern base last month, carried out a series of high - level attacks. The elite fought IS militants in eastern Mosul on Thursday, seeking fresh momentum in a five - week offensive to recapture Iraq 's second city.

Maan al-Saadi, commander of the Counter-Terrorism Bureau (CTS), told AFP that his army is fighting near Al-Khadraa on the Mosul front. They can not escape, they have two choices: give up or die, he said. Over the last few days, Iraqi troops have cut off major supplies from Mosul to the western border. Syria and the IS still control the city of Raqqa.

The US-led coalition also demolished the bridge across the Tigris River to divide Mosul into two, reducing the ability of the armed forces to re-supply the eastern front.

Spokesman John Dorlian said, "Iraq's entry into the southeastern region has begun to catch steam.


'Cruel' fight
"It is an extremely tough fight and brutal, but there is an inevitable task," he told AFP, "Iraqis will try to win them."

IS fighters moved from a complex tunnel network and blocked the Iraqi army through seemingly endless supplies of snipers, booby traps, and suicide vehicle bombers.

Authorities have not released figures of casualties since the attack began, but the combatants were amazed at how fierce the resistance was. Iraqi forces launched a massive attack on Monday to attack Mosul again. Mosul is the place where Abu Bakr al-Baghdad declared the Caliph in 2014.

They are headed towards the city from the north, not only from the south, but also from Mosul airport. Among the troops deployed in the south and west of the city are Hashed al-Shaabi, a paramilitary organization's umbrella governed by a militia supporting Tehran.

They have still focused their business on Tal Afar, located in the western west of Mosul, and announced on Wednesday that they have cut off the main road between Syria and Syria. It will be very long and dangerous to IS if you are trying to move fighters and equipment between Mosul and Rakha. They are the last two fortresses of the collapsed "state".

The International Organization for Migration (ILO) said 76,000 people have been transferred to displaced from 17th. About 7,000 people have already returned home, leaving about 69,000 displaced people and staying in camps for the most part.

About Shahzad Memon

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