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Tech Worker Visas Face Uncertain Future Under Sessions of Trump

Tech worker visas face uncertain future under Sessions of Trump


Tech worker visas face uncertain future under Sessions of Trump Major US visa programs for skilled workers can face renewed scrutiny. Jeff Sessions, a long-time critic of Donald Trump's next election and technician program, is the attorney general for the Senate.

The H-1B visa employs 65,000 workers and 20,000 graduate students each year. The IT industry, lobbying to expand the program, should now take steps to protect it. Immigration lawyers and lobbyists said.

Trump has signaled a mix of signs on the campaign trail and sometimes criticized the visa but called it an important way to keep foreign talent at other times. But Sessions has long shrugged down this program and introduced legislation last year to lessen visas for large outsourcing companies like Infosys. As the largest user of the H-1B visa, the company provides foreign contractors to US companies to reduce information technology costs.

At a hearing in February, he said. Thousands of American workers are being replaced by foreign labor. The spokesperson of the session did not immediately respond to the comment request. The Trump Transition team spokesman declined to comment.

H-1B visas typically target professional jobs that require college education.


Companies use them as two main ways to hire technical workers. Technology companies such as Microsoft and Google typically hire skilled, paid foreign workers who are in short supply. They help to secure so-called green cards that allow many people to work forever in the United States.

In contrast, companies such as India-based Infosys and Tata Consultancy Services use these visas to position low-wage contractors, and critics say that they are almost never going to permanent residence. Infosys did not immediately respond to your feedback. Tata's spokesman declined to comment.

Labor lottery
H-1B visas are issued by the US Citizenship and Immigration Services through the lottery once a year. This year, companies filed 236,000 petitions for 85,000 hats as defined by US law. They are awarded to employers, not employees, and are tied to specific positions. Democrats and Republican critics allege that companies such as Walt Disney (MT) and US California Edison Co would use the program to fire internal IT staff and replace them with cheap contracts.

In last year's session, Attorney General Eric Holler asked Southern California Edison to investigate the use of the H-1B visa, rather than signing it with Burger Sanders, Richard Durbin, and Sheldon Brown. Disney and Edison did not immediately respond to the comments, but previously they said they paid foreign contractors compared to local staff.

In 2013, the Department of Justice has resolved Infosys' $ 34 million visa fraud case.


A federal investigator accused Infosys of using a business travel visa that is easy to travel to import foreign workers who need an H-1B visa. Investigators insisted that Infosys had told foreign workers to lie to US officials about the cities they would work for.

During the negotiations, Infosys denied the allegations, but agreed to maintain a third-party judge for two years and to provide the government with detailed explanations of what the US government wants to give visa holders. Request for change several constituencies have called for program reform. Including the industry's largest trade group, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. According to Russ Harrison, a government relations officer, he hopes a lottery will be held in favor of a system that will grant visas to companies that offer the most expensive jobs.

This can potentially block employers seeking programs for cheap foreign labor. The session included a similar action in the 2015 bill.

Technology industry groups also want change. FWD.us, an immigration lobby group sponsored by Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg, advocates setting minimum wages and priorities for companies that sponsor H-1B green cards.

We will support program expansion, but we will support program reform," President Todd Shulte said in an interview. The current program is profitable for large corporations, primarily at the expense of both Americans and immigrants, said Gaurav Mehta, a 32-year-old H-1B director from New Delhi who works at a cybersecurity company in San Francisco. H-1B workers are struggling to change jobs without the risk of forced repatriation, he said.

"The current system is not working for Americans and it is not effective for immigrants," he said.

Amazing people Some Trump allies expect to keep the program almost untouched, including Indian-born Chicago businessman Shalabh "Shalli" Kumar who donated $ 900,000 to his campaign.

He said that people are surprised and that leaving us is going to be crazy. Kumar spokesman said in an interview. However, the Kuma authorities urged Trump to get rid of the long-awaited country-specific quota for India and Chinese citizens to obtain permanent residency.

Lawyer John Miano of Immigration Reform Law Institute, a conservative organization affiliated with Trump, gives priority to H-1B applications for high-paying companies. These changes will hurt outsourcing companies. According to government data compiled by the IEEE, the top 10 H-1B visa holders in 2015 were all outsourcing companies.

Tata Consultancy Services was listed on the list of 8,333 H-1B visas. In contrast, Amazon was ranked 12th and only received 826 H-1B visas. Google and Microsoft ranked 14th and 15th respectively, Facebook ranked 24th, and Apple 34th.

Some H-1B visa holders do not wait. Sofie Graham, marketer of the San Francisco start-up company BuildZoom.com and a double citizen in Ireland and the UK, earned an H-1B visa last year. She was able to work for six years on a visa, but she and the company decided to apply for permanent residency. Everywhere I saw people were saying H-1B should be fewer," she said. I wanted to get a green card as soon as possible.

About Shahzad Memon

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